Friday, 9 August 2013
Francisco Grau's picture
Francisco Grau

 Dr. Joyce Aryee continued that a careful study of the curriculum of the over 55 private tertiary institutions in the country reveals a dangerous trend of over concentration on business education, saying such institutions should endeavour to fill the gap of providing the kind of quality entrepreneurs and leaders to help confront Ghana's socio-economic challenges.

 
Friday, 9 August 2013
Francisco Grau's picture
Francisco Grau

 Young Angolans in Luanda are rethinking their city and looking for ways to address congestion and pollution. Further north, a new generation of Nigerian authors is leading the re-emergence of African literature. And creative social entrepreneurs are reshaping societies in Ghana and South Africa. Across the continent, the 'cheetah generation' — as named by Ghanaian economist George Ayittey — is defining a new paradigm for the continent's relations with its partners, old and new. Africa as a whole may not yet fly high and peacefully in the 21st century but it has reached a point where a take-off is inevitable. In a new era of global relations where Africans will play a major role, Americans and Europeans should make sure they are on board.

 
Friday, 9 August 2013
Francisco Grau's picture
Francisco Grau

 A Ghanaian entrepreneur has launched newly assembled heavy duty vehicles in Ghana.

The initiative is the Wontumi Griffon Series made up of heavy duty vehicles assembled in Ghana for various purposes.
First of its kind in Ghana, the trucks are designed to meet the industrial needs of the nation.
The Wontumi series is made up of trucks for construction, agriculture and waste management and comes with hydraulic dumping system designed for self tipping purpose.
 
Friday, 9 August 2013
Francisco Grau's picture
Francisco Grau

 ACUMEN is a social venture capital fund. We provide funding for entrepreneurs who build businesses that provide goods and services to the poor. We’re focused on investing in companies, leaders, and ideas that are changing the way the world tackles poverty. Acumen was established 12 years ago, and we have about $85 million invested in 73 companies globally. We have been in West Africa for two and half years and we have $6.7 million invested in four projects in Ghana and Nigeria. As a non-profit organisation, we raise charitable donations that allow us to make equity and debt investments in early stage companies that provide reliable and affordable access to agricultural inputs, markets, quality education, clean energy, healthcare services, formal housing, and safe drinking water to low income customers.

 
 
Friday, 9 August 2013
Francisco Grau's picture
Francisco Grau

 I have decided that any old Joe can start a company. In fact all you have to do is have an idea. It doesn’t even have to be a good one. All you need is for a bunch of other Joes to want it. In Africa, all the Joes are starting their own business, but not all the Joes can make it work — after all, This is Africa (TIA).

We have written a fair amount about tech startups in Africa that have shown they have the potential to impress and have gained some very serious traction. Some companies have received funding in the millions, international investment and lots of press. That’s very cool.
 
Friday, 9 August 2013
Francisco Grau's picture
Francisco Grau
Over the past year, How we made it in Africa has interviewed a number of entrepreneurs who are operating businesses in Ghana. While some of them might still have a long way to go before they have ‘made it’ in this growing economy, their entrepreneurial experience has allowed them to gain valuable insight into what it takes to start a business. Here is their advice to Africa’s budding entrepreneurs.